Scientific Illustration by Subject: Botanical/Botany:


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Information about botanical illustrators organized alphabetically by artist's last name.

Also see the following web sites about Botanical Illustration:

Wikipedia: List of florilegia and botanical codices

History of Botanical Illustration


Images Imperfect, the Legacy of Scientific Illustration


The Flowering of Florence: Botanical Art for the Medici


Early Botany Illustrated


Birds, Bees and Blooms, A selection of natural history books from Special Collections


The Art of Botanical Illustration: Herbals and Early Works


Amazing Rare Things: The Art of Natural History in the Age of Discovery


Evolution of the Art of Botanical Illustration


An exhibition of flower illustration in books since the Renaissance

Australian National Botanic Gardens
Database of naturalists and artists from Australia.

Early Herbals
"The most influential early Latin herbal was that of Apuleius Barbarus, Apuleius Platonicus or Pseudo-Apuleius. The herbal is an important compilation of medical recipes, compiled from Greek sources of the year 400 A.D..."

The Gordon-Craig Gallery, "Specialists in Botanical Works of Art," artists represented include:  Elvia Esparza Alvarado, Christine Stephenson, Deborah Lambkin, Jenny Jowett, Pandora Sellars, Pauline Dean, Joanna Langhorne, Rodella Purves, Siriol Sherlock, Kathy Pickles, Rheinhild Raistrick, Carol Woodin, Judi Stone, Jonathan Piers Tyler, Christabel King, Kay Rees-Davies, Christine Hart Davies, Valerie Price, Polly Morris, G. D. Ehret, P.J. Redoute, Leslie Berge, Wendy Walsh, Mary Chambers Bauschelt, Andrew Peter Brown, Gillian Barlow, Jessica Tcherepnine, Niki Simpson

The Plant Materials Image Collection Project: University of New Mexico / Albuquerque
"Some of the earliest plant images in Western history are found in Karnak, Egypt, on the walls of the Temple of Thutmose III. The representations consist of groups of plants in bas-relief, and date from around 1500 BC..."

Books about botanical illustrators:

New Flowering: 1000 Years of Botanical Art by Shirley Sherwood. Artists include Ferdinand Bauer, Margaret Meee, Maria Sibylla Merian.

The Art of the Garden: Collecting Antique Botanical Prints by Denise DeLaurentis. Artists include Basil Besler, Maria Sybilla Merian, Mark Catesby, Georg Ehret, George Brookshaw, Robert John Thornton, Pierre Joseph Redoute.

The Art of Botanical Illustration

The Art of Botanical Illustration: The Classic Illustrators and Their Achievements from 1550 to 1900
by Lys De Bray

"Reprint of the Collins (London) fourth edition of 1950, presenting 55 plates in b&w with a selection of 16 fine color plates added. This beautiful book, which may fairly be called a classic, surveys the evolution of botanical illustration from the crude scratchings of paleolithic humans down to the highly scientific artwork of 20th century illustrators."


The Art of Botanical Illustration: An Illustrated History

The Art of Botanical Illustration: An Illustrated History
by Wilfrid Blunt

"Reprint of the Collins (London) fourth edition of 1950, presenting 55 plates in b&w with a selection of 16 fine color plates added. This beautiful book, which may fairly be called a classic, surveys the evolution of botanical illustration from the crude scratchings of paleolithic humans down to the highly scientific artwork of 20th century illustrators."



The Art of Flowers: A Celebration of Botanical Illustration

The Art of Flowers: A Celebration of Botanical Illustration, Its Masters and Methods
by Jack Kramer

"A fascinating overview of the golden age of floral art! The Art of Flowers is a magnificent look into the very best in 19th century botanical illustration by such renowned artists as Pierre Joseph Redouté, George Brookshaw, Jane Loudon, Georg Ehret, James Andrews, Rogert Tyas, James Sowerby, and Clarissa Badger. Packed with scores of dazzling, full-color reproductions-many of them rarely seen before-this incredible book displays how the best artists of the era coaxed blossoms to flower on paper. The Art of Flowers begins by exploring how this artistic genre developed, discussing how some simple botany basics came to enhance the art of drawing flowers. It goes on to celebrate the wonderful passion for flowers that flourished in the Victorian era and discusses the beautiful botanical periodicals that swept through England and America. In fact, many of these periodicals are still popular with today's collectors for their dazzling illustrations. Next, readers will discover the intriguing phenomenon of language-of-flower books: charming and hugely popular references that assigned sentimental values to flora . . . and were often accompanied by poetry and delightful dashes of morality. These guides explained to gentle readers how to use flowers to send secret messages to lovers and admirers. Finally, The Art of Flowers provides a fascinating section of rare how-to-draw flower books from the 19th century, complete with ready-to-use templates for copying such flowers as anemone, clematis, dahlias, daisies, lilies, daffodils, pansies, roses, and more. Written by an esteemed authority, The Art of Flowers is a magnificent display of rare art and how-to instruction-the perfect addition to every art lover's library and a delightful gift for anyone who gardens, paints, or simply loves flowers."


The Cactaceae: Descriptions and Illustrations of Plants of the Cactus Family

The Cactaceae : Descriptions and Illustrations of Plants of the Cactus Family: Volume III and Volume IV
by Nathaniel L. Britton, John N. Rose


The Clutius Botanical Watercolors: Plants and Flowers of the Renaissance

The Clutius Botanical Watercolors : Plants and Flowers of the Renaissance
by Claudia Swan

"During the Renaissance, the boundary between art and science was not as clearly drawn as it is in the information age. One of the key functions of science in da Vinci's day was to accurately and elegantly depict the denizens of the natural world, and nowhere did the scientist-artists shine more than in botanical studies. The Clutius Botanical Watercolors offers a glimpse into the world of 16th-century naturalists, who spent much time 'botanizing.' This particularly gorgeous collection of original (but unsigned) drawings and watercolors was owned by Theodorus Clutius, a Netherlands pharmacist, and they were used to instruct budding scientists and physicians at Leiden University.

" These plant studies are exquisitely detailed and delicately colored, retaining both usefulness and beauty. Every needle on the pine bough is painstakingly rendered. Each pea leaf, tendril, and flower is accurate and dainty. Each plant in the pleasure garden, the kitchen garden, and the wild is drawn and tinted to perfection. This book is a joy to leaf through for botanists, artists, and fans of Renaissance naturalists." --Therese Littleton


Flora: An Illustrated History of the Garden Flower

Flora: An Illustrated History of the Garden Flower
by Brent Elliott, Simon Hornby
From Library Journal:
"Librarian and archivist of the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), Elliott (Victorian Gardens) presents spectacular examples of five centuries of botanical illustration taken from drawings and printed works in the RHS's collection. These are organized into five chapters corresponding to the five great sources of garden plants: Europe, the Turkish Empire, Africa, the Americas, and Asia and Australasia. Elliott introduces each chapter with a description of how the influx of new flowers from each area was incorporated into gardens and gardening design in Britain. His brief text for each of the beautiful, oversize illustrations focuses on the plants themselves; how and when they were first discovered, described, and named; how they were used; and how their popularity waxed and waned. This book makes no attempt to be a history of botanical illustration; indeed, the one flaw is that the sources of the illustrations are relegated to a list at the back of the book. The book concludes with a useful essay on plant names through history and short biographies of the illustrators. Recommended for all larger gardening collections."
Daniel Starr, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


Garden Eden: Masterpieces of Botanical Book Illustration

Garden Eden: Masterpieces of Botanical Book Illustration
by H. Walter Lack

"This survey of 483 fine color plates from outstanding works of botanical illustration from the 6th-20th centuries, paralleling a concurrent exhibit at the Austrian National Library in Vienna, indeed evokes the Garden of Eden. Lack (Free U. of Berlin), director of the Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem, provides a trilingual German-English-French essay 'on the diversity of the plant kingdom' and introductions to the artwork of each illustrator.."


Nature Illuminated: Flora and Fauna from the Court of Emperor Rudolf II

Nature Illuminated : Flora and Fauna from the Court of Emperor Rudolf II
by Lee Hendrix (Editor), Georg Bocskay, Joris Hoefnagel, Thea Vignau-Wilberg (Editor)

"The most important legacy of the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II is the Mira calligraphiae monumenta, a manuscript comprised of illuminated pages of calligraphy. Around 1561 a master calligrapher wrote the text as proof of his preeminence among scribes. After his death, a master Illustrator was employed to illuminate his writing, and the outcome is a rare combination of words and images in small-scale drawings--considered one of the wonders of Renaissance Europe. This book culls different plates from the collection that are each unique, consisting of lavishly executed text in Roman and Hebrew letters accompanied by realistic and detailed drawings of plants, animals, and insects."


An Oak Spring Flora: Flower Illustration from the Fifteenth Century to the Present Time

An Oak Spring Flora: Flower Illustration from the Fifteenth Century to the Present Time
by Lucia Tongiorgi Tomasi
Includes the artwork of Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues, Georg Dionysius Ehret, Nicolas Robert, and Pierre Joseph Redouté.

"This authoritative and magnificently illustrated presentation of the art of flower depiction in the West is the third volume in a series of catalogues that describe the rare in some cases unique books, manuscripts, and other works of art conserved at Oak Spring Garden Library, Upperville, Virginia, a collection formed over many years by Rachel Lambert Mellon. The author, Lucia Tongiorgi Tomasi, has selected more than one hundred items from Oak Spring's extensive holdings, which include superb manuscript florilegia, botanical prints, books of instruction of every kind, still-life and vanitas paintings, and various ornamental ceramics and textiles. Among them are examples by some of the greatest names ever to have worked in either scientific or decorative botanical art Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues, Georg Dionysius Ehret, Nicolas Robert, and Pierre Joseph Redoute.

"An Oak Spring Flora is thematically organized, with topics ranging from Tulipomania and women artists to Dutch and Flemish painting and the search for exotics in remote lands. In her introductions the author provides the personal and contextual backgrounds that are essential for a real understanding and appreciation of floral illustration past and present. The sheer beauty as well as extraordinary skills encountered in, for example, manuscript florilegia by Jacob Marrel and Maria Sibylla Merian, hand-colored books by Pierre Vallet and G. B. Ferrari, and flower studies by John Constable and others, are testament to the high status accorded floral illustration over the centuries.

" The latest addition to the Oak Spring Garden Library series will be of great interest to collectors of rare books and fine-art historians as well as to botanists, garden historians, and gardeners in general."


Picturing Plants: An Analytical History of Botanical Illustration

Picturing Plants: An Analytical History of Botanical Illustration
by Gill Saunders

"Some of the most ravishing images in the history of illustration have been those of plants. But who drew plants, and why? How have these images reflected our changing relationship with the natural world? This beautifully illustrated book explores the purpose and function of the whole range of botanical art, from early woodcut herbals and painted florilegia, botanical treatises and records of new discoveries, to gardening manuals, seed catalogs, and field guides for the amateur enthusiast. Gill Saunders complements the sumptuous illustrations with detailed captions and an informative text, making this a book for both specialist and lay reader. Drawing on a rich archive of material in the Victoria and Albert Museum, much of it unpublished until now, Saunders presents works ranging from the fifteenth- century printed book to the art of contemporary illustrators. She includes acknowledged masters such as Ehret and Redoute as well as lesser-known examples from China, Japan, and India. In addition to their intrinsic beauty, plant illustrations have mirrored the curious and fascinating relationship between art and science. The artist's challenge has been to reconcile the often conflicting demands of those disciplines within a single image. Picturing Plants captures both this complex cultural history and the distinctive loveliness of botanical illustration, bringing a fresh approach to a perennially fascinating subject."


Treasures of the Royal Horticultural Society

Treasures of the Royal Horticultural Society
by Brent Elliott
Includes illustrations of flowers, fruit, and plants by such artists such as Ferdinand Bauer, John Curtis, William Curtis, Georg Ehret, Walter Fitch, Mary Grierson, William Hooker, Margaret Stones, and Augusta Withers.


Women of Flowers

Women of Flowers: A Tribute to Victorian Women Illustrators
by Jack Kramer, Eric Strachan (Photographer), Linda Sunshine (Editor)
From Ingram:
"Since the early 1970s, horticultural expert Jack Kramer has been collecting works by Victorian women artists. Women of Flowers is his tribute to those women who received so little credit in their own day and age. Over 150 floral paintings and prints illustrate the life stories of 35 women artists from America, England, Germany and France.150 full-color illustrations."