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Scientific Illustration by Subject: Collections of Works

Anatomy and Medical Illustration


The Physician's Art: Representations of Art and Medicine

The Physician's Art: Representations of Art and Medicine
by Julie V. Hansen, Suzanne Porter, Martin Kemp, Duke University
From the Publisher
“Like a work of art, a medical image or a piece of medical paraphernalia has a period style. This is not simply a surface gloss, a decorative mode that stands in a superficial relationship to the true function of the item. Function and the ‘look’ of something are not separate, since any action is hedged around by attitudes, hostile and approbatory, and our instinctive visual reaction to any item in a field as highly charged as medicine will be an itegral part of the social field within which participants function.”—from the foreword by Martin Kemp
Spectacular Bodies: The Art and Science of the Human Body from Leonardo to Now

Spectacular Bodies: The Art and Science of the Human Body from Leonardo to Now
by Martin Kemp, Marina Wallace

"This magnificently illustrated book accompanies the most ambitious exhibition in the Hayward Gallery's program for the year 2000. [The book] is a ground-breaking exhibition with the potential to be a visual, cultural, and academic revelation with profound impact. The project encourages a new way of looking at visual objects from the territories that are conventionally labeled 'medicine' and 'art.'
"The human body is an astounding feat of engineering. For centuries man has striven to understand its complexities, both artistically and anatomically, often resorting to human dissection. Illustrating the point at which medicine and art collide, Know Thyself brings together an extraordinary range of more than 250 objects from more than eighty medical and art museums and collections worldwide. Works of art from across the centuries include the anatomical drawings of Leonardo, Michelangelo, Durer, and Stubbs, seventeenth-century portraits of surgeons and paintings by great masters including Rembrandt, Hogarth, Courbet, Gericault, and Degas. These works will be shown in a new context alongside medical instruments, prints, and drawings used in the medical study of the human face and body, and life-size anatomical models.
"Today, as forensic and medical sciences advance as never before - with the development of genetic fingerprinting, cryogenics, and designer babies - artists continue to find inspiration in the human body. Video installations, photography, and sculpture will present new perspectives on the historic material. The eight contemporary artists involved range from internationally celebrated video artists Bill Viola and Tony Oursler, to younger artists like Gerhard Lang, Christine Borland, and Marc Quinn.
The Quick and the Dead: Artists and Anatomy

The Quick and the Dead: Artists and Anatomy
by Deanna Petherbridge (Editor), Ludmilla Jordanova

"The human body has long been central to Western art, and in order to represent the body in all its manifestations many artists have studied anatomy: dissecting the dead to better depict the living. The Quick and the Dead focuses on a range of artists, among them Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Albrecht Durer, William Hogarth, George Stubbs, Thodore Gricault, Kiki Smith, Joel-Peter Witkin, and Cindy Sherman to show the great richness and complexity that can result when art and science intersect. The drawings, prints, photographs, and objects in this book span five centuries and mark numerous cultural shifts, yet their imagery is as powerful today as when it was created. Bodily representation has shadowed Western art since the High Renaissance, particularly in the form of atlases of anatomical prints, detailed drawings, and wax cadavers used for teaching purposes. Studying anatomy was deemed so essential that it was part of the instruction program in the earliest Italian academies. Now contemporary artists interested in cultural constuctions of the body are reinvigorating the subject, with the fragmentation of human form being a prime concern. Since 1858, Gray's Anatomy has served to legitimize notions of "serious" science unchallenged by the frivolity of art. But in recent years a kind of rapprochement between medical history and cultural theory has occurred, and new medical technologies have become a wellspring for artists as well as for doctors. As The Quick and the Dead makes clear, the human bodysymbolic and intimate, material and sacredis a vital cultural resource and a site where various social constituencies find relevant meaning."
The Body in Parts

The Body in Parts : Fantasies of Corporeality in Early Modern Europe
by Carla Mazzio (Editor), David Hillman (Editor)

"An examination of how the body--its organs, limbs, and viscera--were represented in the literature and culture of early modern Europe. This provocative volume demonstrates, the symbolism of body parts challenge our assumptions about 'the body' as a fundamental Renaissance image of self, society, and nation."
Anatomical Publications

Books of the Body: Anatomical Ritual and Renaissance Learning
by Andrea Carlino, John Tedeschi (Translator), Anne C. Tedeschi (Translator)

"We usually see the Renaissance as a marked departure from older traditions, but Renaissance scholars often continued to cling to the teachings of the past. For instance, despite the evidence of their own dissections, which contradicted ancient and medieval texts, Renaissance anatomists continued to teach those outdated views for nearly two centuries.
"In Books of the Body, Andrea Carlino explores the nature and causes of this intellectual inertia. On the one hand, anatomical practice was constrained by a reverence for classical texts and the belief that the study of anatomy was more properly part of natural philosophy than of medicine. On the other hand, cultural resistance to dissection and dismemberment of the human body, as well as moral and social norms that governed access to cadavers and the ritual of their public display in the anatomy theater, also delayed anatomy's development.
"A fascinating history of both Renaissance anatomists and the bodies they dissected, this book will interest anyone studying Renaissance science, medicine, art, religion, and society."
Medicine: An Illustrated History

Medicine: An Illustrated History
Albert S. Lyons R. Joseph Petrucelli
From the Publisher:
"An extraordinary pictorial history of medicine, this comprehensive reference traces the growth and organization of the medical profession through its social, political, and historical backgrounds. Documents, drawings, and wall paintings from every place and period are effectively used."
History of medical illustration, from antiquity to A.D. 1600
by Robert Herrlinger
(Click link to buy)
The Fabric of the Body : European Traditions of Anatomical Illustration
by K.B. Roberts, J.D.W. Tomlinson
(Click link to buy)





 

 

 

 

 

 

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